Gross Anatomical Studies on Facial Bones of the Skull of Indian Mongoose (Herpestes javanicus)

Prasanth Babu Ankem *

Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Science, Proddatur, YSR District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Karuna Sri Vaddi

Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Science, Proddatur, YSR District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Supriya Botlagunta

Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Science, Proddatur, YSR District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Sai Urmila Talupuru

Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Science, Proddatur, YSR District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Nagamalleswari Yamani

Department of Veterinary Anatomy, College of Veterinary Science, Proddatur, YSR District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

Divya Sahithi Ankem

B.V.SC and A.H Undergraduate Internship Training Student, NTR College of Veterinary Science, Gannavaram, Krishna, District, Andhra Pradesh, India.

*Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.


Abstract

Maxillae were the principal bones of the upper jaw and carry the upper cheek teeth. The lateral surface of the body just above the upper 3rd or 4th cheek tooth infra orbital foramen is present; the alveolar socket for the canine tooth is located at the junction of the alveolar border of the maxilla and premaxilla. The palatine surface bears an anterior palatine foramen. The alveolar sockets for the last molar tooth were opened into the temporal fossa. Incisive bones showed three alveolar sockets for the upper incisors. The Palatine process was a thin plate that forms the rostral part of the hard palate. Nasal bones do not make any articulation with the maxilla bone. The frontal extremities of the nasal bones are blunt, and two bones together fit into the groove formed by the two frontal bones. The rostral extremities of two bones were free for muscular attachment. Lacrimal bones were articulated dorsally with the orbital plate of the frontal bones, ventrally with the palatine process of the maxilla, rostrally with the caudal border of the maxilla, and caudally with the perpendicular part of the palatine bones. The facial surface extends very little, or not at all, beyond the orbital margin. The orbital surface was small and quadrilateral in outline. Lacrimal Bulla was absent. Zygomatic bones were placed between the lacrimal and maxilla rostrally. The temporal process was long, strongly curved, and forms the bulk of the bone. Between the horizontal and vertical parts of the palatine bones forms the posterior 3/4th of the nasal cavity. The rostral extremity of the pterygoid bones were articulated with the palatine bones, and the posterior extremities were free and carried by the by the hamulus. The rostral extremity of the vomer bone has almost reached the body of the incisive bone. The ventral turbinate is larger than the dorsal one. Two halves of the mandibles were not fused completely. The body presents three alveoli for the lower incisors and one alveolus for the canine tooth. It has six alveoli for the lower cheek teeth. The 5th alveolus was larger than the remaining ones and carries a carnassial tooth.

Keywords: Facial bones of the skull, gross anatomy, Indian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus)


How to Cite

Ankem, P. B., Vaddi, K. S., Botlagunta, S., Talupuru, S. U., Yamani, N., & Ankem, D. S. (2024). Gross Anatomical Studies on Facial Bones of the Skull of Indian Mongoose (Herpestes javanicus). Journal of Advances in Biology & Biotechnology, 27(6), 72–81. https://doi.org/10.9734/jabb/2024/v27i6867

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